Around 1980 or so, my mother and step-father decided to fully retire and move from Pullman to Sequim, Washington, a town of 7,000 people whose mayor is now in, for him, a most unwelcome spotlight. I’ve been to Sequim a few times. It’s not far from Port Angeles where Raymond Carver, the famous short-story author and his wife, Tess Gallagher, a well-respected poet, lived until Carver’s death from cancer.

During their working lives, my mother served as a legal secretary for the law firm of Neill, Atkin, & Schauble. Whenever I called her on the phone for something important (she…


That is my contention, not only at present but well into the future, of the more recent ideas which have come to me; I am convinced that these same ideas will one day exonerate me; and not only exonerate me, but set me free.

Why do I make such an unlikely contention? Obviously, Edgar Rice Burrows was as lowbrow. But before that he was a reader; and I am more than certain that he had read the Frenchman philosopher — not De Cartes but Rosseau. Rosseau set Burrows off on his ideational path which would lead to his own version…


Some years ago in my twenties when I lived in Bellingham, Washington, I read a good deal of Husserl, the “father of phenomenology.” I I also read Peirce’s “Love, Chance, and Logic,” which vaguely alluded to the “practice” of phenomenology. Peirce also alluded to the so-called sightings of supernatural phenomena, which he did not dismiss outright, as any pure rationalist would in those days.

Much later I came across Whitehead’s dialogues with a Boston journalist which went on for several years. While at Cambridge, Massachusetts, he taught philosophy at Harvard until he retired in 1937. He died ten years later.


I’ll first explain what I mean by the word “gaze.” One’s attention is always foremost in any “gaze,” which does not only include visual imagery, strictly speaking. We can replace the word “gaze” in this matter with “reflective or meditative vision.” Now this designation does open the matter in question up a bit. “The reflective or meditative vision” is precisely what any journalist worthy of the name seeks to “come into,” for a skill of this nature is not gained overnight, much as anyone would like.

Many widely-noted and vaunted abilities in a man or a woman often take the…


Most adults with children know that by October the flu season will be well underway. And the flu virus, as most or at least some of us know, does alter its form on an annual basis. We have dealt with various bird flus, swine flus, etc. And now we have a quite virulent form of the Corona Virus to deal with on top of everything else: potential eviction, loss of job, multiple deaths in the family. That is what we will invariably face this fall season.

Why? Because of all those people, many of them in southern, Bible-Belt states, whose…


That the religious right-wing of the Republican Party has profound difficulty with their easily-perceived majesty of Science is repeatedly self-evident. Over several decades, numerous lawsuits have been filed by Bible-Belt school districts whose school board members have not been able to accommodate themselves to Darwin’s theory of evolution propelled by the process of “natural selection.” And as most people know, avowed Christians of the fundamentalist stripe are frightened to death by the thought that the world we see today developed over millions of years and decidedly did not occur in seven days.

That human beings were not instantaneously created by…


In this Age of Inconsequence, to flush everything down the toilet would never have occurred to me. But the impulse to justify oneself rather than do whatever one pleases, what’s the difference? Either way this occupation is the same, whether you merely regard your own life, or what some see as a massive swindle, the grave defense of the United States.

Other than warfare itself, which has served as a solution to human problems from the time people were migrating in small bands searching for food; along with the mania and the woe, the foolish parades of stark immodesty bordering…


In the June edition of Vanity Fair, Ms. Maynard touched upon the life and its aftermath which she spent with J.D. Salinger. The first and quite crucial thing to know about their relationship was that she was younger by almost two generations. She was an 18-year-old freshman at Yale, and he was in his decline physiologically at 53. Moreover, he was a rare breed of hermetic celebrity author, a living example of which would be Cormac McCarthy.

I slowly and carefully and, with great interest, read her entire essay. I was actually astonished at how powerful an impact this relationship…


Cultural analysis, even popular cultural analysis, takes a great deal of, well, information. At bottom and it seems now at the top what is needed is tons and tons (read gigabytes & gigabytes) of information.

But this is surely no problem in what many have called “The Information Age.” Well, what ever happened to “The Computer Age”?; and for that matter, what ever happened to “The Atomic Age,” that dreaded Atomic Age when the atom had suddenly become to new fixture, an idée fixe in the American mind. …


What follows is not exactly the critique of a film. The tortured character portrayed by Mimi Rogers (at a much younger age in her long career as an actor) is left at the end of the film still departed from her murdered daughter who has apparently been “transported” somehow to the blissful state of the “after-life.”

Ah, yes; the so-called after-life. What of it? Well, it remains a definite nuisance from a strict materialist’s point of view. …

Donald Gardner Stacy

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